MRA S1000RR|HP4 Double-Bubble RacingScreen Windshield

MRA S1000RR|HP4 Double-Bubble RacingScreen Windshield
[MRA.07.019.R?]
price$107.50
MRA S1000RR|HP4 Double-Bubble RacingScreen Windshield
Product Description

Racing screens match the lower part of the original screen, but form a bubble in the middle part to reduce wind pressure to the helmet.

MRA was the first manufacturer to introduce double-bubble racing screens at the 1994 IFMA international motorbike trade fair in Cologne. This screen type was developed with the aim of reducing air resistance on racing and sports bikes, thus increasing the top speed.

Riders such as Max Biaggi, Loris Capirossi, Alex Barros, Carlos Checa, Andrew Pitt, Gary McCoy, Ralf Waldmann, and Nobby Ueda were to win the Grand Prix and other world championships on Grand Prix machines using MRA racing screens in the following years.

This resounding success on the track could not be taken onto the street without modification. The round bubble reduced ride stability by generating lift at top speeds on some models as well as helmet buffeting unless the rider hunched down right behind the screen.

This led to significant changes in the bubble shape on the latest generation of racing screens, with flattening towards the upper edge to pull the front of the bike down rather than push it up, while also eliminating helmet buffeting to the side. The front part has air intake vents to reduce the vacuum under the bubble, which also improves the airflow at the end of the screen. These alterations have been applied to existing models, giving older motorbike models the benefit of this new development.

7cm longer and 3cm higher, the MRA racing windshield was successfully driven in 2009 at the SBK World Championship.

MRA S1000RR|HP4 Double-Bubble RacingScreen Windshield
Produced by MRA of Germany

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